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Festival 2022: A Comprehensive and Colorful List of Celebrations in India

Get ready to mark your calendars and immerse yourself in the vibrant and diverse culture of India!

The festival season of 2022 is fast approaching, and it promises to be a spectacular showcase of traditions, rituals, and celebrations.

From Janmashtami to Ganesh Chaturthi, this list of festivals is a treasure trove of joy, spirituality, and togetherness.

Join us on a journey through time as we explore the rich tapestry of religious observances and cultural festivities that will undoubtedly leave you mesmerized.

festival 2022 list india

In 2022, there are several festivals in India during the month of August.

Some of the significant festivals include Sawan Somwar Vrat, Andal Jayanti, Vinayaka Chaturthi, Nag Panchami, Mangla Gauri Vrat, Kalki Jayanti, Skanda Shashti, Tulsidas Jayanti, Masik Durgashtami, Varalaxmi Varatham, Friendship Day, Putrada Ekadashi, Pradosh Vrat, Raksha Bandhan, Hayagriva Jayanti, Shravan Purnima Vrat, Anavadhan, Varalakshami Vrat, Gayatri Jayanti, Narali Purnima, Sanskrit Diwas, Bhadrapada Begins, Kajree Teej, Independence Day, Balram Jayanti, Janmashtami, Shitala Satam, Ashtami Rohini, Masik Krishna Janmashtami, Dahi Handi, Kalashtami, Rohini Vrat, Aja Ekadashi, Pradosh Vrat, Masik Shivratri, Pithori Amavasya, Darsha Amavasya, Pola Vrishabhotsav, Bhadrapada Amavasya, Chandra Darshan, Varaha Jayanti, Hartalika Teej, Ganesh Chaturthi, and Kerala Vinayaka Chaturthi.

These festivals cover a wide range of religious and cultural beliefs, offering people in India the opportunity to celebrate and express their devotion.

Key Points:

  • Several festivals take place in India in August 2022
  • Festival include Sawan Somwar Vrat, Raksha Bandhan, Janmashtami, and Ganesh Chaturthi
  • Festivals cover a wide range of religious and cultural beliefs
  • Provide people in India with the opportunity to celebrate and express devotion
  • Also includes Friendship Day and Independence Day
  • Represents a rich tapestry of traditions in India

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💡 Did You Know?

1. India is home to the largest religious gathering in the world, known as the Kumbh Mela. It is held every 12 years, with the next one scheduled for 2022. Millions of devotees gather to take a holy dip in the Ganges River to cleanse their sins and attain spiritual purification.

2. The Pushkar Camel Fair, held annually in Rajasthan, India, is not just about buying and selling camels. It also features unique competitions such as the longest mustache contest, turban tying competition, and even a race for decorated camels. This vibrant festival attracts tourists from all over the world.

3. The Modhera Dance Festival, held against the backdrop of the stunning Sun Temple in Gujarat, showcases traditional Indian classical dance forms. It attracts renowned dancers from all over the country who mesmerize the audience with their skill and grace. The festival typically takes place in January and February.

4. The International Mango Festival, celebrated in Delhi, India, is a paradise for mango lovers. With hundreds of varieties of this tropical fruit on display, visitors can taste and buy different types of mangoes, as well as indulge in various mango-based dishes, desserts, and drinks. The festival usually takes place in July, when mangoes are in season.

5. The Hornbill Festival, celebrated in Nagaland, northeastern India, showcases the rich cultural heritage and diversity of the Naga tribes. It features traditional tribal dances, indigenous sports, folk songs, traditional crafts, and mouth-watering Naga cuisine. This week-long festival occurs every year in December and is named after the Indian Hornbill bird, which is revered by the Naga people.


Third Sawan Somwar Vrat, Andal Jayanti, Vinayaka Chaturthi

The month of August in India holds immense cultural and religious significance. The Festival 2022 list serves as a comprehensive guide to the various celebrations across the country during this time. On August 1, the day kicks off with the observance of the Third Sawan Somwar Vrat, a fasting ritual observed by devotees of Lord Shiva. It is believed that fasting on this day brings blessings and the fulfillment of desires.

Simultaneously, the festival of Andal Jayanti is celebrated. Andal, also known as Goda Devi, was a 9th-century Tamil saint and poetess who composed the renowned literary work called the Thiruppavai. Devotees commemorate her birth anniversary with great enthusiasm, expressing their respect for her contributions to Tamil literature and devotion to Lord Vishnu.

Another significant celebration on August 1 is Vinayaka Chaturthi, dedicated to Lord Ganesha, the remover of obstacles. This festival marks the birth anniversary of Lord Ganesha and is widely celebrated throughout India. Devotees create clay idols of Lord Ganesha, offer prayers, and perform elaborate rituals to seek his blessings for success, wisdom, and prosperity.

Nag Panchami, Third Mangla Gauri Vrat

On August 2, the festival of Nag Panchami is observed, dedicated to the worship of snakes. This festival holds great significance in Hindu mythology as snakes are highly revered creatures. The purpose of Nag Panchami is to seek protection from snake bites and to receive blessings for overall well-being. Devotees honor snake deities by offering milk, flowers, and prayers at snake idols and snake temples.

Similarly, the Third Mangla Gauri Vrat is also observed on this day. This ritual is primarily observed by married women who desire a long and prosperous married life. On this day, devotees observe a fast and perform various rituals to pay homage to Goddess Gauri, who is symbolic of marital bliss and fertility.

In summary:

  • Nag Panchami is a festival dedicated to the worship of snakes in Hindu mythology.
  • The festival is observed on August 2 and involves offering milk, flowers, and prayers to snake deities.
  • The purpose of Nag Panchami is to seek protection from snake bites and receive blessings for well-being.
  • The Third Mangla Gauri Vrat is also celebrated on August 2 by married women.
  • The Vrat is observed to ensure a long and happy married life and involves fasting and rituals dedicated to Goddess Gauri.

“On this day, people come together to honor the divine connection of snakes and seek blessings for their protection and well-being.”

  • Nag Panchami: worship of snakes, seeking protection and blessings
  • Third Mangla Gauri Vrat: observed by married women for marital bliss and fertility.

Kalki Jayanti, Skanda Shashti

On August 3, we celebrate two auspicious occasions: Kalki Jayanti and Skanda Shashti.

Kalki Jayanti is dedicated to Lord Kalki, the tenth and final avatar of Lord Vishnu. According to belief, Lord Kalki will bring an end to the Kali Yuga, an age of darkness, and usher in a new era of enlightenment and righteousness. Devotees worship Lord Kalki on this day, seeking his blessings for a world free from chaos and suffering.

Simultaneously, we also celebrate Skanda Shashti, dedicated to Lord Skanda, also known as Kartikeya or Murugan. Lord Skanda holds the significant position of the commander-in-chief of the Devas, the celestial beings. He signifies valor and courage. Devotees pay homage to Lord Skanda and seek his blessings for protection and success.

Tulsidas Jayanti

On August 4, we commemorate the birth anniversary of the renowned Saint Tulsidas, a poet, philosopher, and devoted follower of Lord Rama. Tulsidas is most notably recognized for his creation of the Ramcharitmanas, a remarkable rendition of Lord Rama’s story in the common language, thereby enabling wider accessibility among the general public. It is a day of profound reverence, during which devotees recite excerpts from the Ramcharitmanas and participate in discussions on Tulsidas’ teachings.

In summary, August 4 is a significant day to honor the birth anniversary of Saint Tulsidas and celebrate his invaluable contributions, particularly the accessibility and impact of the Ramcharitmanas on the masses.

  • Devotees recite passages from the Ramcharitmanas
  • Engage in discourses on Tulsidas’ teachings

Masik Durgashtami, Varalaxmi Varatham

On August 5, two significant festivals are celebrated in different parts of India. Masik Durgashtami is observed every month, dedicated to the worship of Goddess Durga. Devotees fast on this day and offer prayers to seek the blessings of the divine mother for strength, courage, and protection from evil.

Varalaxmi Varatham is predominantly celebrated in South India, specifically by married women seeking the blessings of Goddess Varalakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity. Devotees meticulously prepare an intricately decorated Kalash (sacred pot) filled with rice and coins as an offering to the goddess.

  • Masik Durgashtami is a monthly festival dedicated to Goddess Durga.
  • Devotees fast on this day and seek blessings from the divine mother.
  • Varalaxmi Varatham is celebrated by married women in South India.
  • It is dedicated to Goddess Varalakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity.
  • Offerings include decorated Kalash filled with rice and coins.

“May the goddess bless us with strength, courage, and protection.”

Friendship Day

August 7 is recognized as Friendship Day, a day dedicated to celebrating the beautiful bond of friendship. Friends exchange gifts, spend quality time together, and express their love and appreciation for each other. This day serves as a reminder of the importance of friendship in our lives and the joy it brings.

  • Friendship Day is on August 7.
  • It is a day dedicated to celebrating the bond of friendship.
  • Friends exchange gifts and spend quality time together.
  • They express their love and appreciation for each other.

“Friendship Day serves as a reminder of the importance of friendship in our lives and the joy it brings.”

Fourth Sawan Somwar Vrat, Putrada Ekadashi

Continuing the tradition of Sawan Somwar Vrat, the Fourth Sawan Somwar Vrat falls on August 8. Devotees fast on this day and offer prayers to Lord Shiva, seeking his blessings for a fulfilled life and the attainment of spiritual growth.

Simultaneously, Putrada Ekadashi is observed, an important religious observance for those desiring a child. On this day, devotees fast and offer prayers to Lord Vishnu, seeking his blessings for progeny. It is believed that observing this fast with utmost devotion can fulfill the desire of having a child.

  • Sawan Somwar Vrat is a traditional fasting practice observed by devotees.
  • The Fourth Sawan Somwar Vrat is scheduled on August 8 this year.
  • Devotees seek blessings from Lord Shiva on this day.
  • Putrada Ekadashi, observed on the same day, is significant for those desiring a child.
  • Devotees perform this fast and offer prayers to Lord Vishnu for progeny.
  • Observing this fast with unwavering devotion is believed to fulfill the desire of having a child.

“Pray with devotion, seek blessings from the deities, and your desires shall be fulfilled.”

Fourth Mangla Gauri Vrat, Pradosh Vrat

On August 9th, the Fourth Mangla Gauri Vrat is observed, providing married women with an additional chance to seek blessings for a blissful and prosperous married life. During this auspicious day, women partake in specific rituals and prayers devoted to Goddess Gauri, in the hopes of receiving her divine grace.

Furthermore, Pradosh Vrat is also observed on the same day, occurring twice a month on the thirteenth day of the lunar fortnight. Devotees practice fasting and offer prayers to Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati, with the intention of receiving blessings for good health, fortune, and liberation from worldly attachments.

To summarize:

  • On August 9th, the Fourth Mangla Gauri Vrat and Pradosh Vrat are observed.
  • Mangla Gauri Vrat allows married women to seek blessings for a happy married life through specific rituals and prayers to Goddess Gauri.
  • Pradosh Vrat involves fasting and prayers to Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati, aiming to obtain blessings for good health, fortune, and freedom from worldly attachments.

“Seeking the divine grace of Goddess Gauri, married women observe the Fourth Mangla Gauri Vrat on August 9. Simultaneously, devotees also observe Pradosh Vrat, fasting and praying to Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati for blessings of good health, fortune, and liberation from attachments to the material world.”

Raksha Bandha, Hayagriva Jayanti, Shravan Purnima Vrat, Anavadhan

August 11 in India is a day filled with multiple celebrations. One of the most cherished festivals is Raksha Bandhan, where sisters tie sacred threads called “rakhi” around their brothers’ wrists symbolizing love, protection, and their sibling bond. In return, brothers present gifts and promise to protect their sisters.

On the same day, Hayagriva Jayanti is commemorated, celebrating the birth anniversary of Lord Hayagriva, the horse-headed incarnation of Lord Vishnu. Devotees worship Lord Hayagriva and seek his blessings for wisdom, knowledge, and academic success.

Additionally, Shravan Purnima Vrat is observed, which is a fasting observance held on the full moon day of the Shravan month. Devotees fast, engage in prayers, and perform rituals to seek the blessings of Lord Shiva, aiming to maintain good health and prosperity.

Lastly, the spiritual practice of Anavadhan is emphasized on this day. Anavadhan involves attentiveness and mindful engagement with one’s actions and thoughts. By practicing Anavadhan, individuals can enhance their focus, clarity, and experience spiritual growth.

Varalakshami Vrat, Gayatri Jayanti, Narali Purnima, Sanskrit Diwas, Shravan Purnima

August 12 is a day of diverse celebrations in India. Varalakshami Vrat is observed by married women to seek the blessings of Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity. During this ritual, devotees perform ceremonies and offer prayers to Goddess Lakshmi, hoping for her benevolence and abundance in their lives.

On the same day, Gayatri Jayanti is commemorated to honor Sage Vishwamitra and the divine Gayatri mantra. Devotees perform prayers and recite the Gayatri mantra, seeking enlightenment and spiritual upliftment.

In addition, Narali Purnima, also known as Coconut Day, is primarily celebrated by fishing communities along the coastal regions of India. On this occasion, people offer coconuts to the sea, seeking its blessings for a bountiful harvest and safe voyages.

August 12 is also observed as Sanskrit Diwas, promoting the rich cultural heritage of the Sanskrit language. Various cultural events, competitions, and seminars are organized to raise awareness and appreciation for this ancient language.

Lastly, Shravan Purnima, the full moon day of the month of Shravan, marks the conclusion of the day’s celebrations. Devotees offer prayers and perform rituals to seek blessings from various deities and participate in charitable activities.

These festivities highlight the vibrant and diverse celebrations throughout the month of August in India. They not only showcase the country’s rich cultural heritage but also provide an opportunity for people to come together in joy, harmony, and spiritual devotion.

FAQ

What are the main festivals in India?

India is known for its vibrant and diverse festivals that celebrate religious, cultural, and seasonal events. Diwali, also known as the Festival of Lights, is one of the most important festivals in India. It symbolizes the victory of light over darkness and is celebrated with elaborate decorations, fireworks, and the exchange of gifts.

Another significant festival is Navratri, which involves nine nights of worshiping the Hindu goddess Durga. During this festival, people dress up in colorful traditional attire, perform energetic dance forms, and participate in religious rituals. Dussehra, also known as Vijayadashami, is another noteworthy festival that marks the victory of good over evil and is celebrated with grand processions and the burning of effigies. These festivals are just a glimpse of the rich cultural tapestry that India possesses.

How many festivals are in India?

India is known for its rich cultural heritage and diversity, and it comes as no surprise that it boasts a staggering number of festivals. With over a thousand festivals celebrated throughout the year, India truly lives up to its reputation as the land of festivities. Each festival is an opportunity for people from different backgrounds to come together, embracing their shared traditions and customs, making India a vibrant and colorful country all year round.

What is India’s biggest festival?

Holi, also known as the Festival of Colors, is another grand celebration in India. This lively festival, typically held in March, signifies the arrival of spring and the victory of good over evil. During Holi, people come together to play with vibrant colored powders, dance to traditional music, and indulge in sweets. The festival is a joyous spectacle of unity and merriment, as communities gather to enjoy the revelry and spread happiness.

Which is the top 1 festival in India?

Holi is considered the top festival in India. Known as the “Festival of Colors,” Holi is celebrated with great enthusiasm and joy throughout the country. It marks the arrival of spring and celebrates the victory of good over evil. During Holi, people gather on the streets and throw colored powders and water at each other, creating a vibrant and lively atmosphere. The festival also includes music, dance, and delicious food, making it a truly exciting and memorable experience for everyone involved.